Category: Alcohol

What agonist patients think about alcohol #SBIRT? A new paper out now

What do patients attending family physicians for methadone treatment think of screening and brief interventions for alcohol problems? Except for being screened at the intake, few recalled routine screening or treatment, and felt that primary care staff should be more proactive when addressing excessive drinking.
Check out our new qualitative study (www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2296/14/98/abstract)

Cochrane wins the best paper award in the General Practice category at the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland (#Cochrane)

 Last night, our Cochrane review about Psychosocial interventions to reduce alcohol consumption in concurrent problem alcohol and illicit drug users won the best paper award in the General Practice category at the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland (RAMI)
I’ve heard that it was a great award ceremony night, but I wasn’t able to attend because I’m in Portland (OR) working on a NIDA INVEST fellowship. One of our co-authors, Prof Dunne (UL GEMS Head of research) kindly received the award on our behalf.
Enda Connolly, the Chief Executive at the HRB (*review funder), commended on the award: ‘The HRB is committed to funding top-quality health research that is likely to have an impact on patient care and the health services that they receive,’read more at: http://www.hrb.ie/index.php?id=642&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=244
 Or download the full text review here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD009269.pub2/abstract

Why Empirically Supported Psychosocial Treatments Are Important for Drug Users? New research project

UL researchers have been awarded €300,000 by Ireland’s Health Research Board to develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions for drug and alcohol users in primary care. Psychosocial interventions are described as aimed at reducing consumption behaviour or alcohol-related problems by using psychological approaches

UL Researchers Undertake Study to Evaluate Impact of Psychology Based Treatments for Drugs Users

Principal Investigator and Professor of General Practice at UL, Walter Cullen, explains: “The focus of this study is to evaluate the impact of psychology based treatments as opposed to the approach of medicating patients dealing with drug and alcohol addiction. There is a significant knowledge gap in this area internationally and we hope this study will help practitioners in Ireland assist their patients to deal with this issue.”
 
Led by Dr Jan Klimas Post-doctoral Researcher at the Centre for Interventions in Inflammation, Infection & Immunity (4i) (http://www.4i.ie) hosted by University of Limerick’s Graduate Entry Medical School, the study involves collaborators from a wide range of disciplines and agencies as well as international experts from the UK, USA and Australia.
 
The study, entitled ‘‘Are Psychosocial Interventions Effective for Problem Alcohol Use among Problem Drug Users’ (the PINTA study) will involve over 20 practices in the Midwest and Eastern regions.
 
The Centre for Interventions in Infection, Inflammation & Immunity (4i), Graduate Entry Medical School, UL brings together a multidisciplinary team of researchers focused on developing studies that impact health outcomes.
 
Director of the Centre, Professor Colum Dunne, complimented the team that successfully competed for this funding, adding “this study builds on previous work, also funded by the HRB, that qualitatively explored patients’ and practitioners’ experiences of problem drug and alcohol use. In a recent Cochrane review we identified gaps in the currently available scientific evidence relating to effectiveness treatments for problem alcohol use. This new study will add considerably to that field of practice.”
Read more here …

INVEST-ing: Jan Klimas teams up with US university

NIDA CTN WSN

Jan Klimas, PhD, joins the Western States Node on March 1, 2013, as a NIDA CTN INVEST Fellow.  NIDA is the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and INVEST is International Visiting Scientists & Technical Exchange Program for drug abuse research. Oregon Health & Sciences University hosts Dr. Klimas’ six months fellowship during which he will assess the use of Screening and Brief Intervention (SBIRT) for alcohol use disorders among patients receiving agonist medication for opioid use disorders. 

Professor Dennis McCarty, Co-PI for the Western States Node, will supervise Dr. Klimas during his fellowship.  The research examines addiction treatment in primary and specialty care settings with respect to implementation of screening and treatment for unhealthy alcohol use among opioid-dependent patients in methadone or buprenorphine agonist treatment in Ireland and Oregon.  Dr. Klimas’ prior work in Ireland informs the U.S. investigation… Read more in the NIDA CTN bulletin, issue November 15th, 2012: (http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/bulletin/20121115.pdf

Trust: the usual suspect in the addiction story

Believe me, or not, trust is something that has been emphasized in addiction treatment for many years. One can hardly argue that it has become one of the usual suspects in the life stories of most recovering drug users.

In this post, I write about two main findings of my latest research published in the current issue of the Czech academic journal Adiktologie (Addictiology). Although they may not be the key findings, which I discovered, this blog gives me an opportunity to illuminate what I feel people should take away from this paper.

 

 


This comes with no surprise – trust is key for building or restoring relationships of all people. No matter if they have drug problems, or not. In this way, my research confirmed what common sense tells us without any special knowledge of research. Re-prioritisation of relationships during treatment was facilitated by the experience of help, support and restoration of trust in relationships.

Because I was able to look at the pre-recovery years of drug users lives, when they actively used drugs, I could go with the trust issue a little further. Changes in relationship priority during active drug use occurred on the basis of barriers (e.g. the need to obtain drugs, stigma), which restrained active drug users from engaging in and maintaining the social relationships.

 

This research has further deepened my understanding of how problem drug users function and indeed how similar they are to people who don’t have drug problems. Some readers may not like this, but they may be less different to ‘us’ than we thought. The key factors that keep them function in a way that is hardly acceptable  by the main-stream population are drug-related barriers. These barriers prevent them from engaging in the usual social life pleasures, such as keeping in touch with non-drug-using friends, visiting parents etc. My research highlighted that they don’t do these things because they have different priorities, which are not compatible with them (See Figure 1 below).

Saying that they are not bothered with relationships or that they’ve no interest in them is too simplistic, and as suggested by this research, not true. Other research showed that people with drug problems do engage in social relationships, pro-social activities, social relationships, raising children – they just don’t do it in a way that ‘we’ are willing to accept. The question that remains to be answered by future research is what would happen if the barriers of engaging in culturally-acceptable social activities were removed? Would ‘they’ be more like ‘us’? The first signals supporting this question come from the opioid agonist treatment. People maintained on pharmaceutical opioids, substituting their illicit drug use, lead more stable lives, commit less crime and have better chances of being employed than people without these substitutes.


Original abstract:
Background: interpersonal problems among drug users (DU) are frequent, are related to other problems, and improve during the addiction treatment.
Aims: to better understand changes in relationships which occur in the course of drug use and drug treatment, as well as their subjective appraisal by ex-drug users, using retrospective methodology.
Method: semi-structured interviews with DUs in a therapeutic community (TC) were analysed with descriptive-interpretive method. The coding of interview transcripts into categories was performed in two phases using qualitative software NVivo 7. Five interviews were coded in the pilot phase, followed by an audit by an external psychologist and progressive coding of the rest of the transcripts, with data saturation being reached in the second phase.
Participants: nine male and one female client, aged 18-36 years (mean: 25.9), participated in the study and the length of their stay in the TC was 2-35 months (mean: 9.9). The approximate mean age of drug use onset was 15.6 years (12-28).
Results: the analysis provided 21 categories which were divided into three domains based on chronological order. Changes in relationship priority during active drug use occurred on the basis of barriers (such as the need to obtain drugs and stigma), which restrained active DUs from engaging in and maintaining their social relationships. Re-prioritisation of relationships during treatment was facilitated by the experience of help, support and the restoration of trust in relationships.
Conclusions: this study builds on the previous work exploring the broad issue of social consequences of drug use and offers clients’ perspective on this topic.
Cite as: Klimas, J. (2012) Interpersonal relationships during drug use and treatment from the perspective of clients in a therapeutic community. [Interpersonálne vzťahy v priebehu užívania drog a liečby závislosti z pohľadu klientov/iek v terapeutickej komunite.]. Adiktologie (12)1, 36-45
More at: www.adiktologie.cz

Figure 1. Evolution of relationships during drug use, addiction and treatment