Cochrane wins the best paper award in the General Practice category at the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland (#Cochrane)

 Last night, our Cochrane review about Psychosocial interventions to reduce alcohol consumption in concurrent problem alcohol and illicit drug users won the best paper award in the General Practice category at the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland (RAMI)
I’ve heard that it was a great award ceremony night, but I wasn’t able to attend because I’m in Portland (OR) working on a NIDA INVEST fellowship. One of our co-authors, Prof Dunne (UL GEMS Head of research) kindly received the award on our behalf.
Enda Connolly, the Chief Executive at the HRB (*review funder), commended on the award: ‘The HRB is committed to funding top-quality health research that is likely to have an impact on patient care and the health services that they receive,’read more at: http://www.hrb.ie/index.php?id=642&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=244
 Or download the full text review here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD009269.pub2/abstract

Cochrane conference in Ireland: Making an impact? (#cochraneevidence)

Another conference’s over. This one is among my favourites because it’s about Cochrane collaboration. It attracted around 70 delegates who came to Queens university in Belfast this year.

Lots of interesting discussions with colleagues, e.g. how do you define an expert? or What’s an ideal composition of an expert panel or a committee? It would seem that senior academics, professors or directors are the right experts, but truth may not be so straightforward. Some of these senior people may be simply too busy or think they know it all. Inclusion of junior staff, post-docs, nurses or systematic review authors on expert panels is better because they lack the weaknesses mentioned earlier. What more, they may be the most hard working group in the academia or research in general. Because of that, hey are likely to be dedicated members of expert panels.

A whole different discussion was going on between the conference delegates on Twitter:

Hearing and talking about my/ fellow reviewers’ experiences of doing SRs made me think about what was special different about my own experience or review:

  • it was my first review
  • I’ve applied a truly systematic approach, which received praise from my quality advisor (see previous blog post)
  • it was real quick
  • I had multiple presentations and non-peer reviewed articles about the review
  • I worked for 2 universities
  • I’ve used EPPI-reviewer software, unlike many of my fellow colleagues
  • I’ve used a lot of support from our health information specialists
  • it was done within a unique Health Research Board of Ireland (HRB) fellowships scheme
  • I couldn’t have done it without a strong support from my co-authors and the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol review group (CDAG)

So, what impact had this year’s Cochrane in Ireland conference on me? It helped me to regain my research identity again.
…and the sky in Belfast was grey, yet again.
A copy of my cochrane review can be accessed here:

Why Empirically Supported Psychosocial Treatments Are Important for Drug Users? New research project

UL researchers have been awarded €300,000 by Ireland’s Health Research Board to develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions for drug and alcohol users in primary care. Psychosocial interventions are described as aimed at reducing consumption behaviour or alcohol-related problems by using psychological approaches

UL Researchers Undertake Study to Evaluate Impact of Psychology Based Treatments for Drugs Users

Principal Investigator and Professor of General Practice at UL, Walter Cullen, explains: “The focus of this study is to evaluate the impact of psychology based treatments as opposed to the approach of medicating patients dealing with drug and alcohol addiction. There is a significant knowledge gap in this area internationally and we hope this study will help practitioners in Ireland assist their patients to deal with this issue.”
 
Led by Dr Jan Klimas Post-doctoral Researcher at the Centre for Interventions in Inflammation, Infection & Immunity (4i) (http://www.4i.ie) hosted by University of Limerick’s Graduate Entry Medical School, the study involves collaborators from a wide range of disciplines and agencies as well as international experts from the UK, USA and Australia.
 
The study, entitled ‘‘Are Psychosocial Interventions Effective for Problem Alcohol Use among Problem Drug Users’ (the PINTA study) will involve over 20 practices in the Midwest and Eastern regions.
 
The Centre for Interventions in Infection, Inflammation & Immunity (4i), Graduate Entry Medical School, UL brings together a multidisciplinary team of researchers focused on developing studies that impact health outcomes.
 
Director of the Centre, Professor Colum Dunne, complimented the team that successfully competed for this funding, adding “this study builds on previous work, also funded by the HRB, that qualitatively explored patients’ and practitioners’ experiences of problem drug and alcohol use. In a recent Cochrane review we identified gaps in the currently available scientific evidence relating to effectiveness treatments for problem alcohol use. This new study will add considerably to that field of practice.”
Read more here …

INVEST-ing: Jan Klimas teams up with US university

NIDA CTN WSN

Jan Klimas, PhD, joins the Western States Node on March 1, 2013, as a NIDA CTN INVEST Fellow.  NIDA is the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and INVEST is International Visiting Scientists & Technical Exchange Program for drug abuse research. Oregon Health & Sciences University hosts Dr. Klimas’ six months fellowship during which he will assess the use of Screening and Brief Intervention (SBIRT) for alcohol use disorders among patients receiving agonist medication for opioid use disorders. 

Professor Dennis McCarty, Co-PI for the Western States Node, will supervise Dr. Klimas during his fellowship.  The research examines addiction treatment in primary and specialty care settings with respect to implementation of screening and treatment for unhealthy alcohol use among opioid-dependent patients in methadone or buprenorphine agonist treatment in Ireland and Oregon.  Dr. Klimas’ prior work in Ireland informs the U.S. investigation… Read more in the NIDA CTN bulletin, issue November 15th, 2012: (http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/bulletin/20121115.pdf