Category: Migrant

Random thoughts on academic mobility

What if you decide to take root, but discover a quicksand instead of a firm ground? Serendipitously, I have stumbled upon an essay about dislocation and walked into an exhibition about uprootedness on the same day.
As I wrote earlier, mobility is part of thejob description of early career academics.  A boost to the local university, economy and science are the promised trade-offs for the temporary relocation.  Few have considered the tremendous impacts that mobility has on people’s lives.

Bruce Alexander, a retired Psychology professor at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, BC, theorizes that dislocation causes addiction. Free markets force people to move where the work is and leave their connections behind.

Walter Scottinspired visitors of the Stride gallery in Calgary, Alberta, to think about the fragile links that tie oneself to the place where they are born. They are nourished over the lifetime, consciously or unconsciously. One may not realise how frail they are, until they become stretched to a point of breaking.
Finally, in the Letters to Grandchildren (Greystone Books, 2015), David Suzuki offers grandfatherly advice to his five grandchildren, including this story about the horrendous journey of his Japanese ancestors to Canada:

How Do We Make Tracks? Meeting of The Society for Technical Communication

January 31, 2015– The STC Canada West Coast chapter hosted a day for technical communicators, both new and those more seasoned, which included tips for finding writing jobs, successful grant proposals, benefits of career coaching and many more. In this post, I focus on two sessions that I attended about mistakes made by non-native users of English and informational interviews.
“Everybody makes mistakes; non-native users just add one more layer to the mistakes ecosystem.” Matsuno
Non-native users of English: who they are
Mark Matsuno is a technical writer with more than 12 years of experience as a technical translator specializing in Japanese-to-English translations of engineering and manufacturing documents.
 Despite the disadvantage inherent in being born in a non-English speaking country, the Non-native users of English have much strength. They are SMEs, i.e., subject matter experts. Her engineering-ese is her first language. His accent is terrible, but he writes almost flawlessly. Some cultures may be afraid of speaking, but may be great writers. Their fluency equals how well you they trick someone to think that they’re fluent
Lost in translation
There’s nothing really wrong with their writing, but it sounds awkward. The questions are how much energy do you put into the piece as an editor? How do you see yourself? As a champion of the end user; A defender of the English language; A teacher; someone trying to get on top of their workload
Common mistakes in non-native users of English
Adjective order; Plurals; Articles are something that gives Asian people a lot of problems;
Prepositions; Tense; Direct translation; Dated English (for example, I was once stung by a bumble-bee); Mixed formality.
How to stay sane
Learn another language. In Japanese you can improve quickly, because people in Japan laugh at you; the feedback on errors is instant. Use machine translations. Read plenty of well-written English.
Write lots. Engage in English conversation.
Informational interviews and networking
Wendy Hollingshead and Autumn Jonssen discussed how powerful networking and informational interviews job search tools can be.
Network. Become a member of writing organisations. Meet up. Decide what your industry of interest is and go to the industry specific events. Volunteer; get your email and your work out there. Not just random things but more focussed work that will help your career and the organisation that you volunteer for. Your goal for networking events should be to make at least one quality conversation and one quality connection. Do at least one event p/week. The more work you put in, the better results you’re going to get.
101 Informational interviews: Let them know your goal
The informational interviews can help you to figure out what you want. Find out how your interviewees got to where they are and get some advice from them. A good output from an II is a referral to someone who can bring you closer to your dream job. Always send a thank you note after the interview.

Finally, check out Michelle Vinci’s article on the STC website about using social media for your jobsearch: http://stcwestcoast.ca/chapter/using-social-media-for-your-job-search

Shoes off! You’re in Iceland

Barefooted or not, Iceland is a country for adventure seekers. Planning a trip to Iceland? Our narrated itinerary might help you.

Sunday, 31.8. Skógar

Our Gatwick flight was delayed by 90 minutes due to strong winds. We enjoyed our delay though. The best thing about our flight was a prolonged break in the Gatwick, discovery of a public footpath around a small lake with water lilies and harvest of blackberries. 

Starved by the flight, we bought super healthy bread with walnuts at the Keflavik airport. Fair car Rental Companypicked us up. Gave us printed maps and weather focused. We opted for a used car with “Scratches and dents all over the place”. We managed to drive the 200km to be in the Skógar hostel just before the bedtime. The hostel was very basic, with dorm rooms only.

Monday, 1.09. Hvoll

Nothing is better than a room on your own, especially after the first night in a super basic hostel. Hiking around the Skogar waterfall wasn’t really great fun. After about 2 hours, we finished the hike, exhausted and wet. The wetness wasn’t obvious until we came down and rested for a while when the high wind started again.  The rest of the day, we spent in the Skogar folk museum – a safe haven while the elements had their time outside. 


There were so many things in the museum that we wondered whether they know about all of them. You could spend hours learning about Iceland across several themed buildings plus an open air museum. The Vik finished our day with my hot pool treat and a quick stop in the Icewear which proved to be too expensive for our budget. Missing the grocery store just by 20 mins, we went on a scenic journey by the sea, crossing lava fields under the Laki volcanoes.

 

Our hosts in the Hvoll hostel, Hannes and Guony, have been living there since 1975. Since 1999, they started renting rooms and shortly build the nearby hostel. They still have a farm with a few sheep.

Tuesday, 2.09. Selfoss

After half an hour driving from the Hvoll hostel to the Skatfafell national park, we headed for the looped walk. The walk was well marked with knee-high yellow-end-painted poles. Also very busy with other hikers, especially at the start and end.  The Skatfafellsheiq loop was 15.5 km long and we had about 7 showers on the way, we thought there was no point in taking our raingear off. It took us about 5.5 hours to do the loop walk. At times, we had luck to see bits of the huge Skatfafell glacier pushing its way through the valley. The glacier greeted us with cold wind, the descending side of the walk and mountain Kristínartindar was colder. The trail was rocky at times, especially going down.


On our way to Sellfoss,we stopped to take pictures of the Skatfafell waterfall – foss in Icelandic. We gave a ride to a couple of hikers from France, only to Skogar; happy to see it again in the daylight, we said bye to the youths right in front of the campsite. They told us that they had to stand only 20 mins in the rain and their rides were mostly tourists. But the guy had rides by locals in the past.

Finally arrived to Selfoss at 9.30PM, hungry but happy. In the hostel, again, was a very large kitchen. Surprisingly everybody was hanging out in a tiny lobby/ office because it was warm and the signal was strong enough. The night was crystal clear

Wednesday, 3.09. Golden circle – Geysir, Gullfoss, Pingvellir national park, Borgarnes

Listed in the sub-heading above are the 3 most popular attractions in Iceland.  


The underwater tunnel to Borgarnes was surprisingly long. We went all this way to find that all we needed was in the Borgarness– a great hostel, beautiful town with sunset and a hot tub. Was it safe for women? We asked twice, they immediately replied yes, without even thinking about it. A natural reaction. A well hidden secret which we discovered was the 90.50 FM RUV R2 Radio with programmes for all hard rock lovers. The local settlement museum below the restaurant with a gift shop offered 1 hour tours and good insights into early history – the first 60 years and the Icelandic sagas.

Thursday, 4.09 Grundarfjörður

Our car engine oil started to drip. We went into a garage and they called the car rental company to replace our car. The new car arrived very quickly, in about 3.5 hours. We gave a ride to another couple, they were Germans. We learned from them why there were so many German tourists in Iceland; the return flight from Berlin was only 120EUR.  “Come back next year!” said the notice on the closed restaurant in Hellisandur. The next seafood place in Ólafsvík was served by very young women. Even staff at the gas station was the same age, we wondered why? The explanation came later in the evening.

 

The hostel TV was turned off in the evening. This was the same in hostels yesterday and the day before yesterday. A Hungarian receptionist, Zsuzsi, found a job in Iceland within two hours of her jobhunt, after living for 3 years in Ireland. She wanted to change. Her contract will be over in 4 weeks, after which she’s moving to Reykjavik. “If you say you will do any work, you can find a job there easily,” she said. The fisheries are always looking for people. Some Islanders are overeducated (100% literacy), and they don’t want to do manual labour, such as cleaning. That explained the underage staff in the previous services. We wished her best of luck and went to sleep in the Forest, or Skogur (Icelandic name of our room).

Friday, 5.09. Reykjavik

On the way to Reykjavik, we stopped in the Stykkishólmur for a brisk walk around the harbour hills; everything else was closed for season. The farm in Erpsstadir was supposed to be opened from 1pm, but when the farm lady saw us coming, she opened the shop at 12noon. They have woofers through the helpex.net site every year. Their strawberry ice cream tasted like it was made just yesterday. The dirt road to the farm was safe enough for the maximum speed of 80 kph.

 

 

In the capital, we saw an exhibition of arctic photography by Rangar Alexonn. It documented a slowly disappearing world of melting glaciers and shrinking communities of Inuit. The Flora café in the Botanic gardens, with their resident cat, is the 2014 best kept secret in the town. In the past, women used to wash the clothes in a nearby hot spring which is commemorated by a volcanic sculpture and information boards.

We couldn’t leave Iceland without Bjork’s early and rare GlingGló (1990) album. 

Hope you found this short narration useful. If you’re planning a longer trip to Iceland, check out my friend’s, John Fitzgerald’s blog. It inspired our journey a lot.

John Fitzgerald Images

No Fixed Abode: Movie Screening on Wednesday – 20th August at 10am in Filmbase, Dublin

August 20th, 2014 – South West Inner City Network in Dublin is pleased to invite all to the premiere of No Fixed Abode, a short movie exploring the experience of homeless people in Dublin.
Community Addiction Programme (CAP) launches new website, annual report and ‘Addiction’ play

Pictured above, from left to right, Micheal Murtagh (CAP board member), Elaine Mulvaney (CAP Co-ordinator), Jack Roche (CAP board chairman) and Damien Hughes (FRG/Solid Website Design).

Result of a six-month course for clients in a community addiction programme, the movie tells a real-life story of female homelessness-to-recovery journey.
There were 14 ex-users in the course. The programme was participant led, which means that the movie was created and produced by the participants themselves – from the script, through acting and directing.
As the movie production progressed, the group struggled with the motivation and perseverance with the task. The upcoming screening marks not only a successful completion of a media course, but also celebrates another step forward on the journey of personal development.
Hope to see you there – Wednesday – 20th August at 10am in Filmbase, Temple Bar, Dublin. The screening is FREE and open to all: http://www.swicn.ie/news/
More info on SWICN projects:
Homepage: www.swicn.ie
To stay updated on the movie and media courses, follow @SWICNdublin on Twitter, Facebook or join the event page:
South West Inner City Network (SWICN) is a community organization, providing a wide range of services for adults and young people living in Dublin 8, Ireland.
Community Addiction Programme (CAP) provides a range of services to help problem drug users come off drugs and alcohol, and to restart their lives.
Digital film making course for adults is for people interested in getting an insight into digital film making. It’s an introductory course into digital film making that gives the participants opportunity to learn about script-writing, storyboarding, directing, acting, using camera and sound equipment, editing.

Dear neighbour

An open letter to my neighbour who crashed my bike parked in an underground parking lot.

Thank you for the opportunity to stay at home and to learn how to true a smashed wheel on my bike last night.
You smashed my rear wheel as you were parking on Thursday, between 5-7pm. I parked my bike in a way that part of my rear wheel was in your space. So, both of us played a role in this accident. I’ve learned to not park my bike behind the lines of my parking spot. So, I’ve gained a lot last night.
I did not appreciate though that you did not come to knock on my door and tell me about the wheel. It’s hard, I know. That’s why I’m writing this letter to you. I’ve parked my bike outside the usual bike room only for 2 hours. Normally, I park it in the storage, which is very hard to access. I was going to go to my writing group and could not go there because of the wobbled wheel.
 I’ve got some bike tools because I like bikes and cycling and fixing them. So, I tried to true the wheel for about an hour, but I gave up. The wobble was too bad and couldn’t be fixed without a proper trueing stand. I’ve learned about my limits last night.
Then, I went jogging before going to bed. I want you to know that it’s o.k. to come and talk. We’re neighbours, after all.

Yours,

neighbour