Category: interpersonal problems

Addiction social work fellowship launched

man and boy

Addiction social work fellowship launched!

Substance use disorders disproportionately contribute to the global social and economic burden of disease.

Sadly, their treatment has been inadequate in large part due to an enduring research to practice gap. Here, the competencies for treating and preventing substance use disorders are often lacking from social work education curricula.

Addiction social work fellowship launched in Canada

Recently, the British Columbia Centre on Substance Use started a new interdisciplinary fellowship in addiction social work, nursing and medicine in Vancouver, Canada. We describe the new fellowship program and outline initial impact of the training on knowledge and skills in addiction social work from our qualitative evaluation of the fellowship.

“The Addiction Social Work Fellowship program accepts two positions in Social Work annually. The program strives for excellence in clinical training, scholarship, research, and advocacy and includes specialty training in inpatient and outpatient addiction services, as well as related concurrent disorders training. The program prepares Fellows to work clinically in the field of addictions and take leadership roles in academic and/or research settings.” (www.bccsu.ca)

 

To read the whole story, please visit the journal website https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wswp20 or lookup the paper using the following citation:

Callon, C., Reel, B., Bosma, H., Durante, E., Johnson, C., Wood, E., Klimas, J.  (In Press) Addiction Social Work Fellowship in Addiction Medicine: A Novel Programme in a Canadian setting. (Early Online July 30th) Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions 

If you enjoyed reading this post, you may also enjoy reading about the fellowship here.

50 Shades of Grey Rejection

How does one give specific feedback: what format to follow, which rules to abandon; what are the grave dangers of inflation and how to deal with the fear of criticism? The information is available, but the courage seems lacking – I conclude in my latest post for University Affairs.

Bitter like lemon, the feeling of rejection lingers in your mouth for days – weeks, if you are not used to it. People who write a lot get many rejections and the most prolific writers hardly notice – they simply move on. This is where we all want to be, and I thought I was there, until… 
Vague like grey ash, a recent rejection kicked me out of this sweet acceptance back into the darkness and bitterness. What follows is a condemnation of hazy rejection letters in academia, my way to purge the poison from my system and to provoke discussion about how rejection should (not) be done.

 Read the full post here.

No Fixed Abode: Movie Screening on Wednesday – 20th August at 10am in Filmbase, Dublin

August 20th, 2014 – South West Inner City Network in Dublin is pleased to invite all to the premiere of No Fixed Abode, a short movie exploring the experience of homeless people in Dublin.

Community Addiction Programme (CAP) launches new website, annual report and ‘Addiction’ play

Pictured above, from left to right, Micheal Murtagh (CAP board member), Elaine Mulvaney (CAP Co-ordinator), Jack Roche (CAP board chairman) and Damien Hughes (FRG/Solid Website Design).

Result of a six-month course for clients in a community addiction programme, the movie tells a real-life story of female homelessness-to-recovery journey.
There were 14 ex-users in the course. The programme was participant led, which means that the movie was created and produced by the participants themselves – from the script, through acting and directing.
As the movie production progressed, the group struggled with the motivation and perseverance with the task. The upcoming screening marks not only a successful completion of a media course, but also celebrates another step forward on the journey of personal development.
Hope to see you there – Wednesday – 20th August at 10am in Filmbase, Temple Bar, Dublin. The screening is FREE and open to all: http://www.swicn.ie/news/
More info on SWICN projects:
Homepage: www.swicn.ie
To stay updated on the movie and media courses, follow @SWICNdublin on Twitter, Facebook or join the event page:
South West Inner City Network (SWICN) is a community organization, providing a wide range of services for adults and young people living in Dublin 8, Ireland.
Community Addiction Programme (CAP) provides a range of services to help problem drug users come off drugs and alcohol, and to restart their lives.
Digital film making course for adults is for people interested in getting an insight into digital film making. It’s an introductory course into digital film making that gives the participants opportunity to learn about script-writing, storyboarding, directing, acting, using camera and sound equipment, editing.

Dear neighbour

An open letter to my neighbour who crashed my bike parked in an underground parking lot.

Thank you for the opportunity to stay at home and to learn how to true a smashed wheel on my bike last night.
You smashed my rear wheel as you were parking on Thursday, between 5-7pm. I parked my bike in a way that part of my rear wheel was in your space. So, both of us played a role in this accident. I’ve learned to not park my bike behind the lines of my parking spot. So, I’ve gained a lot last night.
I did not appreciate though that you did not come to knock on my door and tell me about the wheel. It’s hard, I know. That’s why I’m writing this letter to you. I’ve parked my bike outside the usual bike room only for 2 hours. Normally, I park it in the storage, which is very hard to access. I was going to go to my writing group and could not go there because of the wobbled wheel.
 I’ve got some bike tools because I like bikes and cycling and fixing them. So, I tried to true the wheel for about an hour, but I gave up. The wobble was too bad and couldn’t be fixed without a proper trueing stand. I’ve learned about my limits last night.
Then, I went jogging before going to bed. I want you to know that it’s o.k. to come and talk. We’re neighbours, after all.

Yours,

neighbour