Category: Post-doctoral fellow

Irish Canadian project highlights global issue

This toolkit is based on a study that aimed to establish the feasibility and accessibility of training primary care practitioners in addiction medicine.

In particular how international models of addiction medicine training might inform the future of development of General Practice education in Ireland.

 

The study had three phases: in the first phase we conducted a literature review, the second phase assessed needs in both systems. And in the third phase we explored the feasibility of the education.

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Can prescribers avoid contributing to opioid use disorder?

A 21 y/o has surgery for a condition expected to improve. He fills a discharge prescription for 5 days of an opioid at a standard dose. At 1-week follow-up with his family doctor for suture removal, he describes ongoing pain. Can prescribers avoid contributing to opioid use disorder? Is a renewal of opioid appropriate, potentially dangerous, or both? Read more

Can prescribers avoid contributing to opioid use disorder?

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Irish GPs support wider use of naloxone to treat opiate addiction

Two thirds of GPs in Ireland support planned initiatives to provide wider availability of naloxone in the community for treating opiate addiction and overdose, a survey by University College Ireland has found.1
More than 200 deaths due to opiate overdose occur each year in Ireland, one of the highest rates in Europe. Naloxone is an effective opiate antagonist that can revert opiate overdose. “Take home” naloxone schemes, in which patients considered at risk …

by Susan Mayor
BMJ 2017356 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j1103 (Published 03 March 2017)Cite this as: BMJ 2017;356:j1103 

Off the record: addictions in medical schools

If it’s not recorded, it didn’t happen.
An old saying
We wanted to find out how much teaching on addiction get on medical students. In 2011, our colleagues Sarah O’Brien and Professor Cullen searched PubMed (online database of medical papers) for published literature on training of undergraduate medical students in addiction
There is currently no documentation of drug addiction teaching sessions in Irish medical schools.
photocredit: mrmediatraining.com
We looked at other medical databases and we also searched websites of all 6 medical schools in Ireland.  We have searched the literature published after October 2009.
We found nothing in the medical databases. Schools’ homepages did not mention addiction either.
A telephone survey may provide a more accurate representation of how addiction medicine education is incorporated into the medical school curricula.
  
Substance use disorders are a worldwide problem, and have become a major health concern in Ireland particularly.
In their new position paper on addiction, the Irish Medical Organisation recognized the lacking education and called for “appropriate training of all physicians in treatment of addiction” (Irish Medical Organisation, 2015). Although the science behind addiction treatment has discovered new treatments for addiction, the medical doctors don’t know about them, mainly because they get no training on addiction. As a result, they feel unprepared to treat people with addiction who receive inadequate care.

To cite this article: Mitch Wilson, Walter Cullen, Christine Goodair & Jan Klimas (2016): Off the record: Substance-related disorders in the undergraduate medical curricula in IrelandJournal of Substance Use, DOI: 10.3109/14659891.2015.1112853