Category: Career

Posts by Jano Klimas about the academic career and the long and harrowing journeys of academics.

Addiction training provision must meet training needs

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Closing the gap between training needs and training provision in addiction medicine

 

Substance use disorders pose a significant global social and economic burden. Although effective interventions exist, treatment coverage remains limited.

 

The lack of an adequately trained workforce is one of the prominent reasons.

Recent initiatives improved training nationally, but further efforts are required to build curricula that are internationally applicable. We therefore believe that the training needs of professionals in the area have not yet been explored in sufficient detail.

Addiction training provision must meet training needs

We propose that a peer-led survey to assess those needs, using a standardised structured tool, would help to overcome this deficiency.

The findings from such a survey could be used to develop a core set of competencies which is sufficiently flexible in its implementation to address the specific needs of the wide range of professionals working in addiction medicine worldwide.

Source: Arya, S., Delic, M., Ruiz, B., Klimas, J., Papanti, D., Stepanov, A., . . . Krupchanka, D. (2019). Closing the gap between training needs and training provision in addiction medicine. BJPsych International, 1-3. doi:10.1192/bji.2019.27

If you enjoyed reading about this research, you might enjoy reading about a similar needs assessment here:

Scoping the needs of early career addiction specialists, Protocol

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Addiction social work fellowship launched

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Addiction social work fellowship launched!

Substance use disorders disproportionately contribute to the global social and economic burden of disease.

Sadly, their treatment has been inadequate in large part due to an enduring research to practice gap. Here, the competencies for treating and preventing substance use disorders are often lacking from social work education curricula.

Addiction social work fellowship launched in Canada

Recently, the British Columbia Centre on Substance Use started a new interdisciplinary fellowship in addiction social work, nursing and medicine in Vancouver, Canada. We describe the new fellowship program and outline initial impact of the training on knowledge and skills in addiction social work from our qualitative evaluation of the fellowship.

“The Addiction Social Work Fellowship program accepts two positions in Social Work annually. The program strives for excellence in clinical training, scholarship, research, and advocacy and includes specialty training in inpatient and outpatient addiction services, as well as related concurrent disorders training. The program prepares Fellows to work clinically in the field of addictions and take leadership roles in academic and/or research settings.” (www.bccsu.ca)

 

To read the whole story, please visit the journal website https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wswp20 or lookup the paper using the following citation:

Callon, C., Reel, B., Bosma, H., Durante, E., Johnson, C., Wood, E., Klimas, J.  (In Press) Addiction Social Work Fellowship in Addiction Medicine: A Novel Programme in a Canadian setting. (Early Online July 30th) Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions 

If you enjoyed reading this post, you may also enjoy reading about the fellowship here.

6 ways to improve addiction training

new skills training

Addiction training is feasible and acceptable for doctors and junior physicians; however, important barriers persist. We need to learn more about the experience of addiction physicians in the fellowship training programs. Here are the 6 ways to help improve the training.

6 ways to better training

Recently, new programmes have emerged to train the comprehensive addiction medicine professionals internationally and one of them is in Vancouver, Canada. We interviewed 26 persons who completed this training programme. They were psychiatrists, internal medicine and family medicine physicians, faculty, mentors, medical students and residents. All received both addiction medicine and research training. We found six barriers and enablers of training implementation: (1) organisations, (2) structures, (3) teachers, (4) learners, (5) patients and (6) community. Human resources, a variety of rotations, peer support and mentoring fostered implementation of addiction training. Money, time as well as space limitations hindered implementation.

Why training clinicians in addictions

Addiction care is usually provided by unskilled lay-persons in most countries and thus the resulting care inadequate. Effective treatments are overlooked and millions of people suffer despite recent discovery of new treatments for substance use disorders. In rare instances when addiction care is provided by medical professionals, they are not adequately trained in caring for people with substance use disorders; therefore, feel unprepared to provide such care. Physician scientists are the bridge between science and practice. Despite large evidence-base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not combined training of healthcare providers in addiction medicine and research.

Klimas, J., Small, W., Ahamad, K., Mead, A., Rieb, L., Cullen, W., Wood, E., McNeil, R. (2017) Barriers and Facilitators to Implementing Addiction Medicine Fellowships: A Qualitative Study with Fellows, Medical Students, Residents and Preceptors. Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, 12:21
https://ascpjournal.biomedcentral.com/