Category: Qualitative interviews

Why equity hinders effective pain relief for opioid naive people

Equitable access to care is problematic; some people get it, most are left out.

The REDONNA study (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2021.106462) began from the motivation for equitable opioid prescribing in primary care. It aimed to provide prescribing non-judgmental feedback to physicians using audit & feedback letters developed by the @Drug_Evidence and @DrRitaMc @malcolmlaclure

 

They received information about the number of new opioid initiations & how they compared to the average physician. They were provided information on the (lack) of effectiveness on pain for opioid naïve patients through educational webinars: https://doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmac044

 

From this study, we hope to support the uptake of quality prescribing practices that are equity-oriented and evidence-based to help patients manage pain.

Equitable care saves lives

This includes equitable prescribing for individuals who use opioids in addition to medical education that goes beyond and amplifies the message of international @OverdoseDay  #IOAD2022 #endoverdose

Special thanks to @ShawnaNarayan for coordinating REDONNA and crafting educational messages.

Maybe there were four training hours in total, study

There has been a noticeable deficiency in the implementation of addiction science in healthcare practice. Many physicians and healthcare providers feel unprepared to treat addictions following their training. While the inadequate education has been well documented, the perceptions of learners in early-career health professions have not been fully investigated.

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Boost for Oral Opioid Agonist Therapy

Although opioid agonist treatment is effective in treating opioid use disorders, retention in such treatment is suboptimal in part due to quality of care issues. A new initiative sought to boost treatment of opioid use disorders so that people stay there longer. This article describes how teams did in a structured quality improvement initiative in Vancouver, Canada. (more…)

Hospital teaching team keeps fighting opioid crisis

Overdose grafitti

Which student learns best with hospital teams fighting opioid crisis? Understanding how students learn is perhaps the most important way to improve addiction training.

In a new article published by the Substance Abuse journal,  we report findings suggesting that the completion of an elective with a hospital-based Addiction Medicine Consult Team appeared to improve knowledge of medical students more than of other types of students. Read more below or listen to the podcast.

Firstly, we found that both emerging and established physicians appear to be responsive to this type of training.  Secondly, the learner self-assessment can provide valuable feedback to the consultants. Then, consultants can focus more on the students who learn less.

Keep fighting opioid crisis through training

The study sample was drawn from medical students, residents and physicians who took part in a month-long rotation with a hospital-based addiction medicine consult team in Vancouver, Canada. The addiction rotation includes full-time clinical training involving intake assessment and treatment planning. And referrals to community agencies and starting people on evidence-based medications for substance use disorders. The students take part in didactic lectures, bedside teaching, journal clubs and some prepare papers for submission to peer-reviewed journals. Each year, about 80 learners go through the program. Furthermore, learners rate their knowledge before and after the training.

At the end, all learners reported increased knowledge. One group, however, learned more than the others – the medical students. This two-year study confirms that a structured clinical training program can lead to an increased knowledge on addiction and that medical students benefit from it the most.

For more info read the full article at:

Gorfinkel, L., Klimas, J., Ahamad, K., Mead, A., McLean, M., Fairgrieve, C., Nolan, S., Small, W., Cullen, W., Wood, E., Fairbairn, N. (2019) In-hospital training in addiction medicine:  A mixed methods study of health care provider benefits and differences. Substance Abuse (Published online Jan 28) doi: 10.1080/08897077.2018.1561596

If interested, you can also read: What can hospital teams teach medical students about addiction to help curb the opioid overdose epidemic?

Hospital teaching teams confront iatrogenic opioid addiction

 

Or visit a post that talks about this research as it was presented at the Canadian Society for Addiction Medicine link here

Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine, CSAM conference

Addiction social work fellowship launched

man and boy

Addiction social work fellowship launched!

Substance use disorders disproportionately contribute to the global social and economic burden of disease.

Sadly, their treatment has been inadequate in large part due to an enduring research to practice gap. Here, the competencies for treating and preventing substance use disorders are often lacking from social work education curricula.

Addiction social work fellowship launched in Canada

Recently, the British Columbia Centre on Substance Use started a new interdisciplinary fellowship in addiction social work, nursing and medicine in Vancouver, Canada. We describe the new fellowship program and outline initial impact of the training on knowledge and skills in addiction social work from our qualitative evaluation of the fellowship.

“The Addiction Social Work Fellowship program accepts two positions in Social Work annually. The program strives for excellence in clinical training, scholarship, research, and advocacy and includes specialty training in inpatient and outpatient addiction services, as well as related concurrent disorders training. The program prepares Fellows to work clinically in the field of addictions and take leadership roles in academic and/or research settings.” (www.bccsu.ca)

 

To read the whole story, please visit the journal website https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wswp20 or lookup the paper using the following citation:

Callon, C., Reel, B., Bosma, H., Durante, E., Johnson, C., Wood, E., Klimas, J.  (In Press) Addiction Social Work Fellowship in Addiction Medicine: A Novel Programme in a Canadian setting. (Early Online July 30th) Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions 

If you enjoyed reading this post, you may also enjoy reading about the fellowship here.